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I've always wanted to read "The Goldfinch" by Donna Tartt, but I was a little intimidated by the 900 pages and I put it on a shelf. Then, a few days ago, I read the news about the film-adaptation of the book and I decided it was the right time to read it.
The first few hundred pages are very slow, but when the story begins it's all a hurricane, there are some redundant descriptions but the characters are fantastic and the plot is intriguing. One of the most beautiful modern novels I have read.

I saw that people say Donna Tartt's style reminds them of Dickens but to me it is more a long winded version of Salinger. I recommend it.


Then I read The Secret History by Donna Tartt. I preferred The Goldfinch but it was another compelling book, I couldn't put it down. It's a little like Dead Poets Society, but with way more drug/alcohol abuse and murder. The characters are ancient Greek students and it made me realise it's been ten years since high school, I reeeally miss studying ancient Greek. 

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I recently finished Turtles All The Way Down (possibly John Green's worst) and Children In Time which was awesome. Just started TRANNY by Laura Jane Grace - we'll see how it goes. 

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Finished Handmaid's Tale a few weeks ago, pretty solid but fucked up. The show is better IMO.

Reading Name of the Wind (The Kingkiller Chronicle #1), about 1/3 of the way through. One of the best fantasy novels I've ever read. Seriously a fantastic read so far. Haven't read a fantasy novel this good since GoT. 

 

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36 minutes ago, Speedo said:

LJ wrote a book? Huh, didn't know that. Let me know how that goes.

Im one chapter in so far. Its essentially an auto biography that seems to focus on the gender issues but a lot of reviews said it reads more like a history of Against Me!. Its weird so far, there's no charm or nuance to the writing its just reflective and direct. 

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Speaking of which, what's everyone's favourite band/music biographies?

I've read Scar Tissue, I Am Ozzy, and Travis' book. Scar Tissue was probably my favourite.  I've heard the Motley Crue one is pretty crazy. I also have Bob Dylan's and Heavier Than Heaven kicking around at home, still need to read them. 

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24 minutes ago, Kay said:

Im one chapter in so far. Its essentially an auto biography that seems to focus on the gender issues but a lot of reviews said it reads more like a history of Against Me!. Its weird so far, there's no charm or nuance to the writing its just reflective and direct. 

I won't ever actually read it. I love Against Me!, They are the first band I ever really clung to and I was there in the beginning when they were playing shows for 20 people. That being said, I don't care about Tom becoming Laura or Trans issues. Be what you want to be, whatever but I don't care and don't want to hear or read about it. You're a member of my favorite band, just write me some new music. I don't care about the lives of musicians.

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I am starting Robert Fisk's 'The Great War for Civilisation: The Conquest of the Middle East' tonight. It'll be one of the few books I choose to read without a companion book. I tend to pair up books in opposing style -The Bible and Harry Potter for example - 'cause I feel it helps me get through a book when I can take a break at the tedious parts and put my attention on something a little easier to digest. This book is 1041 large pages with small print; I can't add a companion book to it, I'll be fucking reading it still in November.

 

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Name of the Wind has prompted a profile revamp for me. Unreal book.

Just check this shit out:
 

“Perhaps the greatest faculty our minds possess is the ability to cope with pain. Classic thinking teaches us of the four doors of the mind, which everyone moves through according to their need.

First is the door of sleep. Sleep offers us a retreat from the world and all its pain. Sleep marks passing time, giving us distance from the things that have hurt us. When a person is wounded they will often fall unconscious. Similarly, someone who hears traumatic news will often swoon or faint. This is the mind's way of protecting itself from pain by stepping through the first door.

Second is the door of forgetting. Some wounds are too deep to heal, or too deep to heal quickly. In addition, many memories are simply painful, and there is no healing to be done. The saying 'time heals all wounds' is false. Time heals most wounds. The rest are hidden behind this door.

Third is the door of madness. There are times when the mind is dealt such a blow it hides itself in insanity. While this may not seem beneficial, it is. There are times when reality is nothing but pain, and to escape that pain the mind must leave reality behind. 

Last is the door of death. The final resort. Nothing can hurt us after we are dead, or so we have been told.” 

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On 12/22/2017 at 2:37 PM, Elisa said:

Man Without a Country is a must-reading collection of short stories. Vonnegut is mad as hell about so many things but still makes you laugh and feel. 

Harrison Bergeron is another short story I really really liked. 

Update: still haven't found a copy of Man Without a Country. Gonna be on my next amazon order. Saw that Harrison Bergeron is in Welcome to the Monkey House so I might pick that up in the meantime as it's at my local Barnes and Noble. 

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5 hours ago, vic vinegar said:

Did the style stay direct or was there more emotion later on? Just curious based on your initial comments on the book as I love Against Me!

Its just fairly direct, I got used to it and it worked later on. If you like the band I'd recommend it. 

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1 hour ago, Kay said:

Its just fairly direct, I got used to it and it worked later on. If you like the band I'd recommend it. 

So, I'm torn on this ... If it's an in depth history of the band and a look at the song writing and politics I am down but if it is a trans issues book then I don't care to read it.

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7 hours ago, Speedo said:

So, I'm torn on this ... If it's an in depth history of the band and a look at the song writing and politics I am down but if it is a trans issues book then I don't care to read it.

It's kind of both, tbh. 

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I finally read John Darnielle's Wolf in White Van and it was so unusual and affecting. It's gonna be on my mind for quite some time (Darnielle is the man behind the band The Mountain Goats.)

I also read his second book, Universal Harvester. It was weird, with a mood that reminded me of a mix between Twin Peaks and some horror movies from 90, but the plot wasn't very definitive and there was no resolution. It's a well written book but when I finished it I didn't know what to make of it. 

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On 2/2/2018 at 6:21 PM, Kvothe said:

Speaking of which, what's everyone's favourite band/music biographies?

I've read Scar Tissue, I Am Ozzy, and Travis' book. Scar Tissue was probably my favourite.  I've heard the Motley Crue one is pretty crazy. I also have Bob Dylan's and Heavier Than Heaven kicking around at home, still need to read them. 

old post, but let me just say gregg allman's my cross to bear is my absolute favorite musician autobiography. it's a breeze to read. engaging, funny, reflective, poignant... i can't say enough good things about it. if you're only remotely familiar with the allman brothers band, you'll still have a good time. he led a wild life, one also filled with tragedies and of course, your pre-requisite rock star addiction story. but the way it's written is very conversational with some weird southern charm. anyway. i just love it.

mo meta blues by questlove is pretty good, and i read parts of i am brian wilson and didn't hate it. dream boogie, the sam cooke book, is exhaustive but still interesting. oh, and how music got free is an enthralling book that came out a few years back that i was really into.

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