Jump to content
 

Blink Studio Discussion Thread


Recommended Posts

if you're a musician they drive you bonky. i listen to popular music and all i see are the chords, in my head.

 

Im a musician, and it doesn't bother me that much. most of the time it's forgiveable, unless its like Katy-Perry style of obvious. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 4.8k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

New travis interview.  Blink update starts around 7 minute mark.  Some good stuff in there. 70-80% done with the album Best work in a decade since untitled John Feldmann Produ

Posted Images

if you're a musician they drive you bonky. i listen to popular music and all i see are the chords, in my head.

 

Kinda. Not as musician as big music listener from a lot of eras and styles -as any people here-; and I think that... although a basic chord progression being repeated on several songs is noticeable, if the melody is strong enough to float all over the song, becoming the 'main line', you won't be noticing the same bed of chords on those songs. I mean, a song is not a song before the main melody is done. Or better said: a chord progression is not a song.

 

But moreover, if you dive into primitive rock 'n' roll, jazz and blues, you'll notice how much the same chord progressions were repeated, but the songs are different. How much different? As much as the main melody is different between them. An example (not that primitive, but ot serves): you can take La Bamba from Ritchie Valens -which, to be fair, is rooted on a type of traditional mexican song- and Twist and Shout by The Beatles. Same chord progression, different melody. Different songs, being The Beatles' one influenced by Valens' one. But, moreover, if you pay attention to "Louie Louie", by Richard Berry, it uses the same chord progression as "La Bamba" or "Twist and Shout". But if you want to go more into that, I suggest you to dive into cuban traditional music, for example. There are a few genres which use same rythm patterns and same chords progressions, like the Montuno. They use same chord progressions on the songs of an specific genre, more or less, but they are different songs as they use different cadence, rythm pattern and, most important, melody.

 

I mean... melody is what (mainly) makes an evidence when we speak about plagiarism, for example. Not chord progression.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

if you're a musician they drive you bonky. i listen to popular music and all i see are the chords, in my head.

This is why I refuse to learn actual chords and shit.

 

I've been playing guitar for over ten years and I only know like 3 chords.  I prefer to feel music rather then memorize it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

if you're a musician they drive you bonky. i listen to popular music and all i see are the chords, in my head.

But what else is there to do? It's kind of the thing with rock n' roll that it mostly just uses those 4 chords. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Kinda. Not as musician as big music listener from a lot of eras and styles -as any people here-; and I think that... although a basic chord progression being repeated on several songs is noticeable, if the melody is strong enough to float all over the song, becoming the 'main line', you won't be noticing the same bed of chords on those songs. I mean, a song is not a song before the main melody is done. Or better said: a chord progression is not a song.

 

But moreover, if you dive into primitive rock 'n' roll, jazz and blues, you'll notice how much the same chord progressions were repeated, but the songs are different. How much different? As much as the main melody is different between them. An example (not that primitive, but ot serves): you can take La Bamba from Ritchie Valens -which, to be fair, is rooted on a type of traditional mexican song- and Twist and Shout by The Beatles. Same chord progression, different melody. Different songs, being The Beatles' one influenced by Valens' one. But, moreover, if you pay attention to "Louie Louie", by Richard Berry, it uses the same chord progression as "La Bamba" or "Twist and Shout". But if you want to go more into that, I suggest you to dive into cuban traditional music, for example. There are a few genres which use same rythm patterns and same chords progressions, like the Montuno. They use same chord progressions on the songs of an specific genre, more or less, but they are different songs as they use different cadence, rythm pattern and, most important, melody.

 

I mean... melody is what (mainly) makes an evidence when we speak about plagiarism, for example. Not chord progression.

I'd say 99% of all rock songs use that progression. Especially the Ramones...and Blink.

Link to post
Share on other sites

But what else is there to do? It's kind of the thing with rock n' roll that it mostly just uses those 4 chords. 

well, listen to different kinds of music, for one thing.

 

at least in a genre like punk, there are long-playing bands like bad religion that have a very diverse catalog and have only repeated something like a particular chord progression a few times in 30 something years. there are many, many bands that are extremely imaginative and forward-thinking within their given genre. i love blink for sentimental reasons, but they are one of the lesser bands in terms of overall imagination in their genre. and yet, within those confines, they have often been quite creative. so go figure. like everything in life; it's complicated.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If I want inventive chord progressions I listen to The Beatles or The Beach Boys. 


 


Mark and Tom are pretty shit musicians, no doubt. But their limited ability is what makes them so special to me. They were able to create great songs within the confines of a few chord progressions, similar to those rock n rollers from the 50s.  


Link to post
Share on other sites

you know that the beatles were covering that song, right?

 

Yeah, I know, and it has been covered by several bands. Also, Ritchie Valens covered La Bamba too, as I said -I mean, I knew they were not their originals, but that's not the point of the discussion-

 

Anyway, that's the only thing you have to say about the chord progressions discussion?

Link to post
Share on other sites

If I want inventive chord progressions I listen to The Beatles or The Beach Boys. 

 

Mark and Tom are pretty shit musicians, no doubt. But their limited ability is what makes them so special to me. They were able to create great songs within the confines of a few chord progressions, similar to those rock n rollers from the 50s.  

exactly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Kinda. Not as musician as big music listener from a lot of eras and styles -as any people here-; and I think that... although a basic chord progression being repeated on several songs is noticeable, if the melody is strong enough to float all over the song, becoming the 'main line', you won't be noticing the same bed of chords on those songs. I mean, a song is not a song before the main melody is done. Or better said: a chord progression is not a song.

 

But moreover, if you dive into primitive rock 'n' roll, jazz and blues, you'll notice how much the same chord progressions were repeated, but the songs are different. How much different? As much as the main melody is different between them. An example (not that primitive, but ot serves): you can take La Bamba from Ritchie Valens -which, to be fair, is rooted on a type of traditional mexican song- and Twist and Shout by The Beatles. Same chord progression, different melody. Different songs, being The Beatles' one influenced by Valens' one. But, moreover, if you pay attention to "Louie Louie", by Richard Berry, it uses the same chord progression as "La Bamba" or "Twist and Shout". But if you want to go more into that, I suggest you to dive into cuban traditional music, for example. There are a few genres which use same rythm patterns and same chords progressions, like the Montuno. They use same chord progressions on the songs of an specific genre, more or less, but they are different songs as they use different cadence, rythm pattern and, most important, melody.

 

I mean... melody is what (mainly) makes an evidence when we speak about plagiarism, for example. Not chord progression.

you asked for more discussion...

 

"a chord progression is not a song." agreed.

"melody is what (mainly) makes an evidence when we speak about plagiarism, for example. Not chord progression." agreed as well.

i wasn't trying to define an objective standard for plagiarism, or a band repeating themselves. i was reflecting on what i like and don't like, personally, and what drives me bonky, personally. the fact that mark and tom continued to write in I–V–vi–IV so many, many times irks me a bit (even covers they have chosen...another girl, another planet and the cure's letter to elise). it doesn't bother others as much.

my favorite material of theirs avoids this format, even though i still like (begrudgingly?) the songs that hew to it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dammit

What's My Age Again

Feeling This

actually, here's the entire list of blink songs utilizing I–V–vi–IV in some form, in order of appearance. a few are half-step descend variations, but most are straight through.

i think i got them all.

 

time (chorus)

carousel (intro, verse)

21 days (intro)

toast and bananas (verse, chorus)

transvestite (intro, chorus)

m+m's (intro, verse, bridge, outro)

dammit (intro, verse, chorus)

untitled (chorus)

i'm sorry (intro, outro)

i won't be home for christmas (chorus)

aliens exist (verse)

what's my age again? (intro, verse, chorus)

man overboard (chorus)

story of a lonely guy (intro, chorus)

give me one good reason (into, verse)

what went wrong (chorus)

feeling this (chorus)

down (pre-chorus)

always (intro, chorus)

wishing well (chorus)

even if she falls (chorus)

boxing day (pre-chorus, chorus)

pretty little girl (pre-chorus)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just pointing out some singles.  Good list you've made, however, a few are incorrect that I've noticed.

 

Untitled (chorus) - 6 - 4 - 1 - 5 (same order, it just starts at the 6)

Give me on good reason (verse) - 1 - 5 - 1 - 5 - 6 - 4 - 6 - 5

What went wrong - It's a long progression, but it's not 1 - 5 - 6 - 4

Down (prechorus) - 6 - 7 - 1 - 4 - 6 - 7

Always (chorus) - 1 - 3 - 6 - 4

 

 

It's interesting how 4 of their first 5 singles used the 1 - 5 - 6 - 4

my verdict on untitled stands, despite where it starts.

Give me on good reason (verse)...it's still in there. - 1 - 5 - 1 - 5 - 6 - 4 - 6 - 5

 

what went wrong (chorus) it's I–V–vi–IV, but subs the second chord for a half step down from the initial A. this is the 'half step walk down' variation of the progression. i'd argue it still counts.

 

Down (prechorus) - 6 - 7 - 1 - 4 - 6 - 7. got me there. i misheard it. i wanted that V in there!!!

 

Always (chorus), it's I–V–vi–IV, i just played along with it. B-F#-G#-E (just a half step down from dammit). the bass work in the intro incorporates the third position, but i don't hear it in the chorus. interestingly, 1 - 3 - 6 - 4 is the substitute for every third verse progression in aliens exist, giving it a bit of spice. and if continued to the high chord instead of resolving down to the low, you have anthem part II, the outro on lemmings. also here's your letter, and a few others i can't remember.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

We know it's the same progressions and they were great at using them effectively. Layer the song with some synth pads, ya oh's, and lyrics about "combing the lake of fire god" and BOOM you have a bli...I mean, shit, that's all that Tom DeLonge does...

Had to check what you were referencing there.  Damn Mercenaries is some shit writing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's interesting how in the blink world, you can just change the key and tempo, and boom you have a new song

 

It's interesting to see how that happens in almost every genre, not only in bands. In fact, for some authors, a blues is not a blues if it does not have some specific chord progressions. Same as jazz. Nobody here listened expressions like "bluesy chords" or "jazzy chords"?

What I tried to say is that yeah, maybe blink is using the same chord progressions in some songs (or almost the same), but hey... wellcome to music, I repeat: a song is not made about a chord progression. That's why you use ruthm pattent key changes, different structures...

For example, I don't see the same song in What's My Age Again and All The Small Things. Do they use a similar chord progression? Ok. Are they the same song? Nope. Sound they similar? Well... as long as they both are written by the same band.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

actually, here's the entire list of blink songs utilizing I–V–vi–IV in some form, in order of appearance. a few are half-step descend variations, but most are straight through.

i think i got them all.

 

time (chorus)

carousel (intro, verse)

21 days (intro)

toast and bananas (verse, chorus)

transvestite (intro, chorus)

m+m's (intro, verse, bridge, outro)

dammit (intro, verse, chorus)

untitled (chorus)

i'm sorry (intro, outro)

i won't be home for christmas (chorus)

aliens exist (verse)

what's my age again? (intro, verse, chorus)

man overboard (chorus)

story of a lonely guy (intro, chorus)

give me one good reason (into, verse)

what went wrong (chorus)

feeling this (chorus)

down (pre-chorus)

always (intro, chorus)

wishing well (chorus)

even if she falls (chorus)

boxing day (pre-chorus, chorus)

pretty little girl (pre-chorus)

 

The Rock Show(chorus)? All the Small Things(intro)?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...